Point-Counterpoint: US solar sector squabbles over China

first_imgPoint-Counterpoint: US solar sector squabbles over ChinaPresident Barack Obama may soon have to referee the U.S. solar industry’s ongoing rumble over Chinese PV imports and SolarWorld’s zealous crusade against Beijing’s proactive role. February 6, 2014 Edgar Meza Legal Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share The drastically opposing views in the U.S. solar sector on the matter of Chinese photovoltaic imports remain a touchy subject and one that continues to divide the industry. A letter by SolarWorld founder and CEO Frank Asbeck to U.S. President Barack Obama warning of the imminent collapse of the country’s solar business and a sharply worded retort by Jigar Shah, president of the Coalition for Affordable Solar Energy (CASE), is the latest case in point that clearly typifies the rift. Acknowledging Obama’s comments championing America’s solar industry during his recent State of the Union Address, Asbeck touted his faith in U.S. solar technology manufacturing and pointed out that his company had invested more than $600 million in the U.S. However, the SolarWorld chief executive sounded a dire warning about the industry’s vision of solar manufacturing in the U.S: “Today … that vision stands in grave danger. I must tell you respectfully, President Obama, that illegal trade practices threaten to destroy any ongoing U.S. role in global solar-industry competition. China is improperly seizing control of an industry that the United States invented, pioneered and grew.” Instead of joining the growing solar industry, the Chinese government has sought to exploit and dominate the sector, Asbeck argued. “Through state planning, billions of dollars of government subsidies and below-cost pricing, China built massive solar production capacity – enough to supply the world twice over – and drove down pricing to unsustainable levels. It harvested U.S. taxpayer-funded incentives, while keeping foreign competitors out of its own market.” Shah, as expected, was having none of it. “The chairman of German solar manufacturer SolarWorld Frank Asbeck penned a bizarre and frankly reckless letter to President Barack Obama this week, warning that the U.S. solar industry is in danger because of international trade. CASE agrees that the industry is under threat, but it’s entirely at the hands of Mr. Asbeck and his Germany-based company. “In his State of the Union address last week, President Obama championed American solar jobs ‘which can’t be outsourced’ because they are installation jobs which take place on America’s rooftops,” Shah continued. “U.S. solar jobs grew at six times the national employment rate in 2013 because global solar manufacturing, like the manufacture of so many of our consumer electronic goods, has made solar power affordable and attractive to American middle class homeowners. The solar industry contributed nearly 20,000 new jobs to the American workforce in 2013; of these only 100 were in manufacturing. In refuting Asbeck’s position, Shah sounded a warning of his own: “Like the last effort from SolarWorld in 2012, there is no credible case that tariffs will lead to increased U.S. solar panel manufacturing or employment. It’s critical to job growth in our country that we recognize where U.S. solar jobs are coming from, and what drives their growth. SolarWorld’s reckless trade petition would destroy the demand for affordable solar which is creating tens of thousands of jobs per year. It is irresponsible and frankly contrary to American interests for a German company to suggest otherwise in a letter to the president of the United States.” For its part, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has said — in response to the U.S. trade petitions SolarWorld filed late last year against chrystalline silicon products from China and Taiwan — that it opposes the escalation of the U.S.-China solar trade conflict.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW electrolyzer in Spain, hydrogen alliance between Russia and Germany Sergio Matalucci 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com BP, Iberdrola and Enagás will power a 20 MW electrolyzer with 40 MW of solar in Spain. Automotive manufacturers Hyundai,… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… Asia Pacific’s solarized digitization agenda Selva Ozelli, Esq. 23 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The virtual 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum was hosted in March by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment,… Final thought: Solar ethics, forced labor pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)Issue 04 – 2021 April 7, 2021 pv maga… China’s Covid recovery saw green bond issuance rebound in second half of 2020 Max Hall 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The $18bn worth of sustainable finance instruments floated in the nation last year marked a retreat from previous highs … iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. Any other transfer to third parties will not take place unless this is justified on the basis of applicable data protection regulations or if pv magazine is legally obliged to do so.You may revoke this consent at any time with effect for the future, in which case your personal data will be deleted immediately. Otherwise, your data will be deleted if pv magazine has processed your request or the purpose of data storage is fulfilled.Further information on data privacy can be found in our Data Protection Policy.iAbout these recommendationsKeep up to date pv magazine Global offers daily updates of the latest photovoltaics news. We also offer comprehensive global coverage of the most important solar markets worldwide. Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… Grid code compliance in megawatt projects 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsEhsan Nadeem Khan, Grid Code Compliance Engineer, meteocontrolModeratorsMarian Willuhn, Editor… Insight @ Energy Storage North America 2020 11 November 2020 pv-magazine.com Developed and moderated by pv magazine, the panel sessions address a hot topic within the industry, from multiple angles. iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Final thought: Solar ethics, forced labor pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)Issue 04 – 2021 April 7, 2021 pv maga… Battery testing builds certainty pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… Strong growth ahead for storage pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Annual battery storage installations will exceed 10 GW/28 GWh in 2021, following a particularly strong year in 2020, des… ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… Unchained: political moves shift solar supply David Wagman 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com PV module supply chains to the U.S. industry are in flux, and not for the first time. Moves to take action alongside sti… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Peru’s first autonomous indigenous gov’t strikes back against deforestation

first_imgMarcio Pimenta is a freelance photographer and journalist based in southern Brazil. This story was supported by the Rainforest Journalist Fund, in association with the Pulitzer Center, and was first published in Portuguese by National Geographic Brasil on Feb. 27, 2019. Banner image: John Milton, farmer and hunter of the Wampi ethnic group. Amazonas, Peru. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The Wampis is an indigenous group comprised of thousands of members whose ancestors have lived in the Amazon rainforest of northern Peru for centuries.Mounting incursions by loggers, miners and oil prospectors, as well as governance changes that favored industrial exploitation, left the Wampis increasingly worried about the future of their home. Representatives said they realized that only by developing a strong, legal organizational structure would they have a voice to defend their people and the survival of their forest.After numerous meetings among their leaders, representatives of 27 Wampis communities, with a combined population of 15,000 people, came together in 2015. They invoked international recognition of the rights of indigenous people and on Nov. 29 declared the creation of an autonomous territorial government called the Wampis Nation to defend its territory and resources from the growing pressures of extractive industries.Wampis Nation territory covers an area of rainforest one-third the size of the Netherlands along northern Peru’s border with Ecuador. Leaders say their newfound autonomy and authority has allowed them to directly expel illegal deforestation activities from their land. PUERTO GALILEA, Peru — In 2009, special decrees signed by then-president Alan García opened up vast swaths of Peruvian indigenous territory to resource exploitation. Indigenous groups in the northern portion of the country responded by banding together and forming their own autonomous government in 2015 – the first of its kind in Peru – called the Wampis Nation. With its newfound authority, the Wampis Nation has been able to respond to and eject illegal deforestation in its territory, and is continuing to organize and strengthen its voice about land use issues in Peru and abroad.When, Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana set off in search of spices and the mythological golden empire El Dorado in 1541, he could not have known that his voyage would take him to the curves of the largest river in the world. Among the dangers faced by expedition members was a confrontation with the Icamiabas, a legendary female-led warrior tribe that dominated the river at the time. Orellana compared the Icamiabas to the Amazons of Greek mythology, and gave the river the name most know it by today.In the intervening centuries, innumerable explorers and industries have plied its waters and forests in the pursuit of knowledge, adventure, and profit. The Wampis know a lot about these visitors. This indigenous group has lived in the Amazon rainforest for centuries, dispersed through more than 13,000 square kilometers (around 5,000 square miles) in the northern Peruvian departments of Amazonas and Loreto. But members say they’re tired of watching invaders cutting down their forests and polluting their water with mercury used to extract gold from the earth.Illegal logging is visible right off the road outside Wampis territory. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Gold traded clandestinely in Puerto Galilea. Miners often use mercury to separate gold from the surrounding soil. Mercury is also a neurotoxin, posing serious dangers to people exposed to it, and it often escapes into the environment when it’s used in mining. Research has shown high blood levels of mercury in members of some communities living downstream from gold mining operations. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.More recently, the oil industry has moved in. Conflict for land rights intensified in 2009 when then-president Alan Garcia signed decrees permitting foreign companies to access indigenous territories for oil extraction, mining, and logging. As a result, leases for oil and natural gas concessions covered more than 40 percent of the Peruvian Amazon in 2010 – up from 7 percent in 2003.The decrees were announced with the apparent objective of facilitating the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Peru and the United States. However, critics say their implementation violated international human rights standards, such as Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO), which requires indigenous consultation and participation in the use, management and conservation of their territories.In reaction to these decrees, 3,000 members of indigenous groups representing six different regions of the Peruvian Amazon gathered together and blocked a road near the town of Bagua that connects the department of Amazonas with those of Loreto, Cajamarca and San Martin. The protest, called “Devil’s Curve,” lasted 57 days until the government reacted. The subsequent conflict, which would become known as “El Baguazo,” left 33 dead (10 indigenous members and 23 police officers) and more than 200 injured, and led to widespread looting and destruction throughout the region. Recently, the Peruvian government erected a monument in Puerto Galilea to commemorate the massacre and honor indigenous people and other residents.Wampis representatives said they realized that only by developing a strong, legal organizational structure would they have a voice to defend their people and the future of their forest. After numerous meetings among their leaders, representatives of 27 Wampis communities with a combined population of 15,000 people came together in 2015. They invoked international recognition of the rights of indigenous people and on Nov. 29 declared the creation of an autonomous territorial government called the Wampis Nation – the first of its kind in Peru – to defend its territory and resources from the growing pressures of extractive industries. Their territory covers an area of rainforest one-third the size of the Netherlands along northern Peru’s border with Ecuador.The formation of the Wampis Nation means any and all economic activity in their territory requires their consent. But while it is autonomous, the Wampis Nation still considers itself part of Peru: “we are still Peruvians and so we want to remain,” said Shámpion Noningo, technical director of the Territorial Government of the Wampis Nation (GTANW). “We do not want independence, but to manage our territory, and we have the partnership of the government of Peru.”A Wampis child plays in the Ayambis community. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.A Wampis child. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Getting to the Wampis Nation is not easy. When the road ends, one must navigate by boat the remainder of the way. Elmer Tuesta is a driver and owner of one of the boats that makes the trip along the Marañón River from Santa Maria de Nieva to Puerto Galilea, the city that marks the edge of Wampis territory. He says he cannot depart until he has a minimum number of passengers. Tuesta calls out to people who circulate on the quay in an attempt to convince them to travel. It does not take long and the efforts of Tuesta are soon rewarded. His boat full, Tuesta steers it languidly through the haze that blankets the trees of the rainforest like a diaphanous white dress.The trip lasts three hours. Along the way, small boats transporting gold mining equipment are seen anchored offshore. Fearing a reaction from miners, Tuesta does not dare approach, but says that most mining in the territory is on a hiatus until the rainy season ends.A boat loaded with equipment for illegal gold mining waits in the Marañón River, Amazonas, Peru. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Among the passengers are many young Wampis who live in big cities. They wear shirts emblazoned with the names of Spanish clubs and the number of popular Peruvian footballer Paolo Guerrero.“It is the Urban Wampis,” Noningo says, without hiding his disappointment that the young people are abandoning traditions of old. “This is the most difficult part of the process of autonomy….the seduction of the accumulation of goods.”To confront this issue, the Wampis Nation teaches their native traditions in schools, as well as encourages young people to attend meetings of territorial government working groups and to work in agriculture. This is the case of John Milton, who after living in the city, fell in love and married a Wampis woman and decided to stay. He is still trying to find his space and switches his activities between farming and hunting, but confesses to missing his former urban life. Different is the case of Henery Cuja, who also decided to return after completing a nursing technician course and now provides healthcare in the Ayambis community. He is worried as the heat increases every year and with it the proliferation of mosquitoes that transmit dangerous diseases like malaria, dengue, yellow fever, zika and chikungunya.This billboard is part of a government campaign to raise the awareness of the risks of mosquito-borne illnesses in the department of Amazonas. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Wampis children play. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Those working on the ground in the Peruvian Amazon say deforestation is only making things worse when it comes to threats like malaria, with research indicating logging can increase rates of malaria infection since it creates optimal mosquito breeding habitats: ponds at the edges of forests. According to Cuja, 76 of the 250 residents of the Ayambis community have been infected with malaria, several contracting Plasmodium falciparum – the deadliest malaria species.The Wampis Nation is working to reduce illegal deforestation in their territory. According to Noningo, they have directly expelled illegal miners from their territory. On other occasions, they notified national authorities, who ousted the invaders.An illegally operating gold mine stopped by Wampis intervention. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Addressing logging has been a little more difficult. Unlike other parts of the Amazon rainforest (notably in Brazil), there are no roads in the Wampis region. This makes it more difficult for loggers to clear large areas, but also for authorities to detect illegal deforestation. But Wampis Nation president Wrays Perez says that selective illegal logging is ongoing in the region, with timber smugglers targeting capirona trees (Calycophyllum spruceanum). Also known as bayabochi or mulateiro, the wood from these trees is valuable for use in construction.According to Perez, loggers access these trees from the river at night, with one person acting as a sentry. Once the tree is felled and trimmed, the loggers load it up on their boat in the morning and carry it down the river to sell it.An illegally felled capirona tree. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Illegally harvested timber awaiting pick-up by a boat that will transport it to market. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Since the founding of the Wampis Nation, the relationship between the Wampis and the Peruvian government has been relatively quiet. Lieutenant Colonel Herberts Cavero Medina, head of the Information Section of the 6th Jungle Brigade, attributes this tranquility to the excellent relationship between the Wampis Nation and the Armed Forces of Peru, which has a strong presence in the territory due its location along the border with Ecuador. After a 1995 conflict between Peru and Ecuador known as Cenepa’s War, the army has worked to locate and remove active landmines from many areas in indigenous territory.Medina says that young Wampis serve in several battalions in the region and indirectly receive information on illegal logging and mining operations. The army then informs the country’s authorities to remove the invaders – if the Wampis have not already done so.A soldier in the Peruvian army in camouflage and prepared to watch over the country’s borders. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.The colors of the flag of Peru painted on the face of a Peruvian army soldier. Some soldiers are Wampis members. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Wampis members are allowed to hunt and cultivate up to 5 hectares anywhere they’d like in the territory. And agriculture is profitable. For example, merchants say cocoa can be sold to outside buyers for 3.2 soles per kilo, with a hectare producing on average 1.5 tons per month. Noningo said they’re also considering ways to mine gold “manually, without machines, which is not to attack the forest and to value gold.”The Wampis’ biggest concern is the oil industry, according to Perez. He specifically calls out the Oleoducto Norperuano oil pipeline, part of which runs through Wampis territory. In total pipeline extends 1,106 kilometers from the Amazon rainforest to the Pacific Ocean to supply the Peru’s refineries. The pipeline has a long history of spills and leaks, with at least 23 occurring between 2001 and 2016. In 2016, the pipeline was shut down temporarily after it experienced three spills in five months.A section of the Oleoducto Norperuano pipeline, which runs 1,106 kilometers from the rainforest to the Pacific Ocean. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Perez is also attentive to the outside world, especially to Brazil, the largest economy in South America. The recent election of far-right Jair Bolsonaro as Brazil’s new president is particularly worrisome to him, and he laments the new government’s move to lump the Ministry of Environment under the Ministry of Agriculture and open up indigenous territories to resource exploitation.“This will greatly affect the Amazon rainforest of Brazil and the rights of the people who live there for thousands of years and have always preserved the forest,” Perez said.Wray Perez, president of the Wampís indigenous community. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.In a world where actions to preserve forests and fight climate change find resistance in the old ideas of new governments, the Wampis are hoping their new identity as a free territory will help change the conversation. For now, though, their focus is on building their capacity and protecting their home.“The Spaniards did not conquer us directly, we were not slaves, we were absorbed when the states were formed, so we need a lot of time to finally organize ourselves with one voice,” Noningo said. Climate Change, Community-based Conservation, Diseases, Environment, Forests, Fossil Fuels, Governance, Government, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Logging, Malaria, Mining, Oil Drilling, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more