Big Mac knocks

first_imgSmart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next We are young Instead, Belo got called out third by Blackwater, the presumptive top-pick holder in the special draft. The Elite also had first choice in the regular draft, where they selected Raphael Banal, the son of former PBA coach Joel Banal who played for Hope International University in Fullerton, California.All the fuss on the unique, and some say confusing, Draft was no big deal for the former Far Eastern University stalwart, who just wants to focus on proving his worth in the country’s biggest league.“The pressure is there, but I’m ready to accept the challenge,” says Belo. “I’ll just give my best. [Blackwater] has a good mix of veterans and young guys, so it’s a good team.”Then there’s also his duties with the national team under returning Gilas Pilipinas coach Chot Reyes, who can pull out Belo and other pool members from their PBA stint any time for an international tournament.“Playing for the Philippines is the best feeling for me,” shares Belo. “But now I have the PBA and I have Gilas, so I have to be ready for both.”ADVERTISEMENT Blessed with size, speed and skill, Belo powered the FEU Tamaraws to the UAAP Season 78 men’s basketball championship against the University of Santo Tomas Tigers last year. His selection as Finals Most Valuable Player, with averages of 16.8 points and 10.3 rebounds in the Final Four and the Finals, sweetened the victory even more.But Belo isn’t just remembered for FEU’s championship romp. His epic buzzer-beater shots against both La Salle and Ateneo in two UAAP Final Four seasons arguably put him among the league’s all-time best clutch performers.In 2014, Belo ended the Green Archers’ bid for back-to-back crowns when he buried a triple right at the buzzer, lifting the Tamaraws to a 67-64 victory and sending them to the UAAP Finals.The following season, Belo again towed the Tamaraws to the title round after nailing a putback just as time expired for a 76-74 triumph over the Blue Eagles.Both shots made Belo a social media trending topic. Fans came up with memes, like how the league’s two glamour squads got “Belo-fied,” a play on the marketing catchphrase of celebrity cosmetic surgeon Vicki Belo (whom he has no relation, by the way).“It just happens,” Belo says of his game-winners. “I don’t plan on doing it, it just happens.”Belo carried his winning ways to the PBA D-League, where he won back-to-back championships and an MVP award with Phoenix.In international play, Belo also picked up gold medals with the Gilas Pilipinas Cadet team in the 2013 Burma (Myanmar) and 2015 Singapore Southeast Asian Games, the 2015 Southeast Asia Basketball Association (Seaba) tilt in Singapore and the 2016 Seaba Cup in Bangkok. He also suited up for the country’s campaign in the 2016 Fiba Asia Challenge in Iran and the 2016 Fiba 3×3 World Championships in China.All these, impressively, in a span of three years. “Hopefully, I get to learn more,” says Belo.Clearly, he’s just getting started. Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Araneta seeks Peping Cojuangco ouster Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway The extra work doesn’t worry Belo, the 23-year-old who’s very much used to toiling on court after taking the long road, literally, to amateur hoops success.Growing up in Midsayap, North Cotabato, Belo thinks he’s no basketball prodigy. Unlike some of his peers—say, former Ateneo star Kiefer Ravena or fellow FEU standout Mike Tolomia, who were tagged as potential talents even before high school—the 6-foot-3 cager made his presence felt just three years ago.“When I first came to Manila, I had nothing, zero [knowledge of basketball],” shares Belo. “I got recruited because of my height and I was athletic. I had to go through everything step by step—the terms, the drills.“Here I had to learn the game fast because I did not consider myself a good player when I was still playing in our province. I seldom played in Midsayap because I did not want people to see how I moved or took shots.”Belo only decided to join the varsity team of Saint Mary’s Academy of Midsayap on his senior year in high school. Before starring for the Tamaraws, he had a brief stint with Notre Dame of Midsayap College, where former FEU mentor Bert Flores spotted him as a raw but athletic player during the National Games of the Commission on Higher Education.How Belo vastly improved—despite admitting he only understood the intricacies of the sport when he joined the Tamaraws—remains pretty much impressive. He surprised even his former FEU coach Nash Racela, who once said that “nobody thought [Belo] would develop into a solid player.”“It was hard at first, but I was able to achieve what I wanted,” says Belo. “I’m really thankful to FEU.”Belo transformed into a do-it-all threat who can go hard in the paint and also smoothly knock down three pointers. Ever efficient, he quickly collected many stellar on-court moments in the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP), the PBA D-League and on the international stage.It’s this string of success that makes many think that Belo has been around for a long time.“I always do extra work,” he says. EDITORS’ PICK Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine PH among economies most vulnerable to viruscenter_img Blacwater Elite picks Mac Belo in the special draft. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNot one to shy away from big moments, Rey Mark “Mac” Belo thrives in the clutch, his confidence hardly wavering. But off the court, the versatile forward returns to his soft-spoken self, often shrugging off attempts to make any situation about him.Even as he reprises his game-hero role many times over, Belo tends to deflect all the credit to his teammates and coaches. Oftentimes, he just feels thankful for the opportunities coming his way.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 MOST READ 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise View comments Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports So it’s really no surprise that Belo didn’t mind the new format of the 2016 Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) Rookie Draft, which technically denied him the official “No. 1 rookie pick” tag this season.“I feel very blessed,” Belo says in Filipino. “I’ve dreamt of being in the PBA, so this is a big opportunity for me.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentVeering away from tradition, the PBA held a special draft for Belo and 11 other amateur members of the Gilas Pilipinas national pool. In a surprise ruling, the pro league opted not to disclose the predetermined Draft order. Then on Draft day, the teams—in alphabetical order—simply announced their selections.So even as the consensus best talent available for recruitment, Belo seemingly got robbed of that once-in-a-lifetime moment where a PBA hopeful basks in the spotlight of marching up the stage first after getting called as the No. 1 pick. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Latam Eco Review: Land trafficking in Lima’s hill ecosystems, oil spills in Venezuela, floods in Colombia

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The most popular stories from our Spanish-language service, Mongabay-Latam, this past week investigated how land trafficking is destroying Lima’s fragile hill ecosystems; government inaction and oil spills in Venezuela; open borders for wildlife trafficking in Belize and Guatemala; massive floods in Colombia; and community reforestation in Bolivia.Land trafficking erodes Lima’s fragile hill ecosystemsLand invasions are trampling Lima’s 19 coastal hills. The national forest and wildlife service lists them as fragile ecosystems, but has not responded to environmental groups calling to protect them. On paper, the government is part of the Eba Lomas Project to create a Lima Hill System conservation area. On the ground, it is building infrastructure projects and roads that lead to more land invasions. In the space between, land traffickers are selling lots for as little as 3,000 soles ($910).Homes precariously built into Amancaes Hill outside Lima. Image courtesy of Cecilia Jananpa, Environmental Protectors of the Flowers and Hills of Amancaes (PAFLA.)Venezuelan government has not revealed the impact of two oil spillsLike a recurring nightmare from Venezuela’s worst oil spill of 2012, in July two more spills were reported in the same locations in the Gulf of Paria and the Guarapiche river. And just like before, the government is not revealing full information about their impact on the environment or nearby communities. What is known is that the disaster zone directly affects the water and coasts of Venezuela since it is located at the delta of the Orinoco river. The government blamed rainfall for the overflow of 1,000 barrels from two tanks at a secondary recovery plant. Experts believe operational failures and a lack of equipment in the state’s oil industry caused the accidents.West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus), classified as critically endangered by Venezuela and Colombia and Vulnerable by the IUCN, are found in the Guarapiche Forest Reserve. Image by Plixio.Belize-Guatemala border dispute gives wildlife trafficking free reinEntire communities are dedicated to wildlife trafficking along the disputed border between Belize and Guatemala. Criminal activity is concentrated in these areas which represent 85% of the total deforestation in Belize, and 74% of Guatemala’s. Confusion over the borders has made the frontier region an ‘area without control,’ according to Guatemala’s environmental prosecutor.Scarlett macaws and parrots are trafficked along this border and sold at a black market in Mexico. Yucatan Rosewood (Dalbergis tucurenis) is also brought to Asia. Image courtesy of the Environmental Prosecutor of Guatemala.Chile’s ocean: over-exploited and pollutedChile is among the world’s top ten fishing countries. Its long stripe of land is only 30% of its national territory – the rest is ocean. Yet according to the most recent annual report from the fisheries department, 62% of its fishing areas are over-exploited, undersupplied or completely collapsed. Meanwhile pollution from the mining, energy and aquaculture industries, as well as plastic, are wreaking havoc on the ocean’s biodiversity.Chilean coast. Image courtesy of Claudia Pool/Oceana.With community help, Queñua forests fight extinction in BoliviaOnly five percent of the Polylepis forests that once covered the tropical Andes from Venezuela to Argentina exist today. Community reforestation programs in Madidi and Cotapata national parks in Bolivia have planted more than 25,000 trees with plans for sustainable development projects. For local Quechua communities, Polylepis forests are integral to their water sources. For a high diversity of birds, including the critically endangered royal cinclodes (Cinclodes aricomae) and the ash-breasted tit-tyrant (Anairetes alpinus), they are vital habitats.Forests of Queñua (Polylepis rugulosa) are important for community water sources. Image courtesy of the Armonía Association.Colombian rivers surge after record rainsHelp has arrived for only half of the communities flooded by rivers in the Orinoco and eastern Amazonia regions of Colombia. In Mocoa township, rain fell for more than seven hours straight. The flooding comes less than year after a 2017 mud slide in Mocoa killed 335 people, injured another 400, and left thousands without homes.Mocoa’s streets after torrential rains that lasted more than seven hours. Image courtesy of the Colombian Civil Defense.Read all these stories in full at Mongabay-Latam in Spanish, here.Banner image: Amancae flowers (Ismene Amancaes) have been re-introduced to Lima’s hills, after their disappearance years ago. Image courtesy of the Environmental Protectors of the Flowers and Hills of Amancaes (PAFLA.) Deforestation, Disasters, Illegal Trade, Oceans, Overfishing, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Article published by Maria Salazarlast_img read more

Is there another Javan Rhino habitat as ideal as Ujung Kulon? (Commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Isabel Esterman Ujung Kulon National Park is the last habitat of the Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus), a critically endangered species.A recent tsunami increased calls for a new habitat to be found in which to establish a second population.Finding an ideal habitats elsewhere is important, but not as easy as some experts and conservationists think.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Ujung Kulon National Park is the last habitat of the Javan rhinoceros. There are only an estimated 67 of the one-horned animals left, according to the park management. A long history colors the journey of this rare and endangered animal, from its early range across east India, Bangladesh, mainland Southeast Asia, and Indonesia, to the last remaining individuals in the Ujung Kulon Peninsula, on the western tip of the island of Java.Animals living in greatly reduced ranges, like the Javan rhino, are known as “relicts,” and are more vulnerable to extinction than endemic animals that have always had limited ranges. The International Union for Conservation of Nation (IUCN) has designated Javan rhinos (Rhinoceros sondaicus) as critically endangered, or one step from extinction.On Dec. 22, 2018, a massive eruption at Mount Anak Krakatau caused a tsunami to slam into the coasts of the Sunda Strait. This powerful wave struck parts of Ujung Kulon National Park; the rhinos were reported to have been safe in their habitat.So what’s the true situation at Ujung Kulon?Two Javan rhinos photographed in Ujung Kulon National Park. Image Hoogerwerf, A., published 1970/Rhino Resource Center.Ujung Kulon means “Western End” in the Sundanese dialect spoken in the region. The peninsula was previously best known for Goa Syanghyangsirah, a cave on the western edge of the southern beach of the peninsula that drew pilgrims from the far corners of Java. This cave is believed to be the final resting place of Prince Kiansantang, the son of a famed Hindu king, who was believed to have been instrumental in bringing Islam to Java. Today, Ujung Kulon is better known as the only Javan rhino habitat remaining in the world.The peninsula is hemmed by the Sunda Strait to the north and the Indian Ocean to the south. Administratively, Ujung Kulon is located in Pandeglang district, Banten province.It was first proposed as a national park in 1980. This area covered a territory of 575 square kilometers, or 222 square miles (Blower and Zon), including the Ujung Kulon Peninsula, Panaitan Island, and Mount Honje Nature Reserve, along with the protected forest area in the north alongside Mount Honje.Through a Ministry of Forestry decree issued on Feb. 26, 1992, Ujung Kulon was officially named a national park, with an area of just under 1,230 square kilometers (475 square miles), consisting of both land (786 square kilometers) and marine (443 square kilometers) areas.A map showing the Ujung Kulon National Park and Anak Krakatau volcanic island. Image courtesy Google Maps.Ujung Kulon Peninsula is divided into three parts: the mountains that stand west of the Cibunar and Ciujungkulon rivers; the wide middle area with hills and lowlands stretching from the northeast to the south; and the northern tidal swamp area of mangroves spanning from Jamang to the east to close to the isthmus at Tanjug Telereng.The mountains in the west form a range of narrow ridges and cliffs that rise perpendicularly from the sea. The peaks of Mount Payung (480 meters, or 1,575 feet) and Mount Guhubendung (500 meters, or 1,640 feet) are located in the southwest and are the highest points of the peninsula.The ridge that extends along the southern coast, stretching from Cibunar to Cibandawoh, is a sand embankment formed from layers of rock and beach sand. It is about 10 meters high and not very wide, with layers of coral often visible.Farther east, between Cibandawoh and Tanjung Tereleng, local rock formations of young limestone and coral stand upright. Here, coral protruding from the sea can be seen.The main rivers found in Ujung Kulon are distinguished by two flow patterns. Rivers that originate from around the hills of Mount Payung and Mount Cikuya have fairly heavy flows. Other rivers originate from Mount Talenca. Most of these rivers are never run dry throughout the year.The shore of Pecuang Island, part of Ujung Kulon National Park. Image by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Ujung Kulon along with Mount Honje and Panaitan Island are part of the young mountain system forming the Sunda Shelf before the Tertiary Period. During the Pliocene, Ujung Kulon and Mount Honje were separate from Java, and may have been part of Sumatra as an extension of the Barisan Mountains running like a jagged spine down the south of that island. It was then separated during the Pleistocene, when the dome of the Sunda Strait folded upward (Blower and Zon).The central and eastern parts of Ujung Kulon consist of a composition of limestone and clay that arose during the Miocene. In the north, the alluvial layer is covered, and the southern coast is covered in sandstone, increasingly so as one moves southward (Hoogerwerf, 1970).Schenkel and Schenkel (1969) stated that the sand dunes along the southern coast from Cibunar to Tanjung Tereleng are formed by layers of coral and sand.In the north, sea and coral sand as well as clamshells are the geological base, although there are also widespread pockets of pumice that are thought to have originated from the eruption of Mount Krakatau in 1883. This eruption also affected most of the of Ujung Kulon vegetation structure as tidal waves as high as 20 meters struck along the north coast.Rhino patrol in Ujung Kulon park. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Records show the Ujung Kulon Peninsula has not been inhabited by humans since the Krakatau eruption (Hoogerwerf, 1970). In the mid-20th century, made their presence felt by carving out pastures in several regions in the north, including Nyiur, Jamang, Cikuya and Cidaon. These actions influenced the structure of vegetation, as has the activity of various foraging animals (Lusli, 1982).The damage wrought through both human activity and natural phenomena has changed the structure of the vegetation. However, the forest on Ujung Kulon is a true lowland rainforest. The vegetation on Mount Payung, at the western tip of the peninsula, is primary forest that appears to have never been disturbed.The lowland rainforest of the Ujung Kulon Peninsula is the last natural habitat of the Javan rhino. There is a sufficient variety of edible plants for the rhinos, consisting of five complex vegetation types: coastal forests, freshwater swamp forests, lowland rainforests, grazing fields, and introduced plants.Thus, finding a second habitat for Javan rhinos outside their natural home in Ujung Kulon is not as easy as some experts and conservation activists think.Moreover, a second habitat for Javan rhinos must be studied in consideration of their natural behavior. The second habitat must truly ensure Javan rhinos are safe, comfortable, and able to add offspring. CITATIONS:Blower JH, Zon APM van der. 1977. Nature conservation and wildlife management project,(Indonesia). Proposed Ujung Kulon National Park including Gunung Honje, Pulau Peucang and Pulau Panaitan management plan, 1977–1981. Field report 2 (English). Forestry Dept. FAO, Rome.Hoogerwerf, A. 1970. Ujung Kulon, the land of the last Javan rhinoceros (with local and general data on the most important faunal species and their preservation in Indonesia). Leiden, Brill EJ.Schenkel R, Schenkel L. 1969a. “The Javan rhinoceros (Rhinoceros sondaicus Desm.) in Ujung Kulon Nature Reserve: its ecology and behaviour: field study 1967 and 1968.” Acta Tropica 26(2): 97–135, figs. 1–9, tables 1–9.Schenkel R, Schenkel L. 1969b. “The last remnants of the Javan rhinoceros in Ujung Kulon Nature Reserve, Java.” Biological Conservation 2(1): pp 68–70, figs. 1–2.Haerudin R. Sadjudin is a senior rhino researcher who has been involved in rhino conservation program for over 40 years in Indonesia.This commentary was first published on our Indonesian site on Feb. 3, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Commentary, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Javan Rhinos, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

Peru’s first autonomous indigenous gov’t strikes back against deforestation

first_imgMarcio Pimenta is a freelance photographer and journalist based in southern Brazil. This story was supported by the Rainforest Journalist Fund, in association with the Pulitzer Center, and was first published in Portuguese by National Geographic Brasil on Feb. 27, 2019. Banner image: John Milton, farmer and hunter of the Wampi ethnic group. Amazonas, Peru. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The Wampis is an indigenous group comprised of thousands of members whose ancestors have lived in the Amazon rainforest of northern Peru for centuries.Mounting incursions by loggers, miners and oil prospectors, as well as governance changes that favored industrial exploitation, left the Wampis increasingly worried about the future of their home. Representatives said they realized that only by developing a strong, legal organizational structure would they have a voice to defend their people and the survival of their forest.After numerous meetings among their leaders, representatives of 27 Wampis communities, with a combined population of 15,000 people, came together in 2015. They invoked international recognition of the rights of indigenous people and on Nov. 29 declared the creation of an autonomous territorial government called the Wampis Nation to defend its territory and resources from the growing pressures of extractive industries.Wampis Nation territory covers an area of rainforest one-third the size of the Netherlands along northern Peru’s border with Ecuador. Leaders say their newfound autonomy and authority has allowed them to directly expel illegal deforestation activities from their land. PUERTO GALILEA, Peru — In 2009, special decrees signed by then-president Alan García opened up vast swaths of Peruvian indigenous territory to resource exploitation. Indigenous groups in the northern portion of the country responded by banding together and forming their own autonomous government in 2015 – the first of its kind in Peru – called the Wampis Nation. With its newfound authority, the Wampis Nation has been able to respond to and eject illegal deforestation in its territory, and is continuing to organize and strengthen its voice about land use issues in Peru and abroad.When, Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana set off in search of spices and the mythological golden empire El Dorado in 1541, he could not have known that his voyage would take him to the curves of the largest river in the world. Among the dangers faced by expedition members was a confrontation with the Icamiabas, a legendary female-led warrior tribe that dominated the river at the time. Orellana compared the Icamiabas to the Amazons of Greek mythology, and gave the river the name most know it by today.In the intervening centuries, innumerable explorers and industries have plied its waters and forests in the pursuit of knowledge, adventure, and profit. The Wampis know a lot about these visitors. This indigenous group has lived in the Amazon rainforest for centuries, dispersed through more than 13,000 square kilometers (around 5,000 square miles) in the northern Peruvian departments of Amazonas and Loreto. But members say they’re tired of watching invaders cutting down their forests and polluting their water with mercury used to extract gold from the earth.Illegal logging is visible right off the road outside Wampis territory. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Gold traded clandestinely in Puerto Galilea. Miners often use mercury to separate gold from the surrounding soil. Mercury is also a neurotoxin, posing serious dangers to people exposed to it, and it often escapes into the environment when it’s used in mining. Research has shown high blood levels of mercury in members of some communities living downstream from gold mining operations. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.More recently, the oil industry has moved in. Conflict for land rights intensified in 2009 when then-president Alan Garcia signed decrees permitting foreign companies to access indigenous territories for oil extraction, mining, and logging. As a result, leases for oil and natural gas concessions covered more than 40 percent of the Peruvian Amazon in 2010 – up from 7 percent in 2003.The decrees were announced with the apparent objective of facilitating the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Peru and the United States. However, critics say their implementation violated international human rights standards, such as Convention 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO), which requires indigenous consultation and participation in the use, management and conservation of their territories.In reaction to these decrees, 3,000 members of indigenous groups representing six different regions of the Peruvian Amazon gathered together and blocked a road near the town of Bagua that connects the department of Amazonas with those of Loreto, Cajamarca and San Martin. The protest, called “Devil’s Curve,” lasted 57 days until the government reacted. The subsequent conflict, which would become known as “El Baguazo,” left 33 dead (10 indigenous members and 23 police officers) and more than 200 injured, and led to widespread looting and destruction throughout the region. Recently, the Peruvian government erected a monument in Puerto Galilea to commemorate the massacre and honor indigenous people and other residents.Wampis representatives said they realized that only by developing a strong, legal organizational structure would they have a voice to defend their people and the future of their forest. After numerous meetings among their leaders, representatives of 27 Wampis communities with a combined population of 15,000 people came together in 2015. They invoked international recognition of the rights of indigenous people and on Nov. 29 declared the creation of an autonomous territorial government called the Wampis Nation – the first of its kind in Peru – to defend its territory and resources from the growing pressures of extractive industries. Their territory covers an area of rainforest one-third the size of the Netherlands along northern Peru’s border with Ecuador.The formation of the Wampis Nation means any and all economic activity in their territory requires their consent. But while it is autonomous, the Wampis Nation still considers itself part of Peru: “we are still Peruvians and so we want to remain,” said Shámpion Noningo, technical director of the Territorial Government of the Wampis Nation (GTANW). “We do not want independence, but to manage our territory, and we have the partnership of the government of Peru.”A Wampis child plays in the Ayambis community. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.A Wampis child. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Getting to the Wampis Nation is not easy. When the road ends, one must navigate by boat the remainder of the way. Elmer Tuesta is a driver and owner of one of the boats that makes the trip along the Marañón River from Santa Maria de Nieva to Puerto Galilea, the city that marks the edge of Wampis territory. He says he cannot depart until he has a minimum number of passengers. Tuesta calls out to people who circulate on the quay in an attempt to convince them to travel. It does not take long and the efforts of Tuesta are soon rewarded. His boat full, Tuesta steers it languidly through the haze that blankets the trees of the rainforest like a diaphanous white dress.The trip lasts three hours. Along the way, small boats transporting gold mining equipment are seen anchored offshore. Fearing a reaction from miners, Tuesta does not dare approach, but says that most mining in the territory is on a hiatus until the rainy season ends.A boat loaded with equipment for illegal gold mining waits in the Marañón River, Amazonas, Peru. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Among the passengers are many young Wampis who live in big cities. They wear shirts emblazoned with the names of Spanish clubs and the number of popular Peruvian footballer Paolo Guerrero.“It is the Urban Wampis,” Noningo says, without hiding his disappointment that the young people are abandoning traditions of old. “This is the most difficult part of the process of autonomy….the seduction of the accumulation of goods.”To confront this issue, the Wampis Nation teaches their native traditions in schools, as well as encourages young people to attend meetings of territorial government working groups and to work in agriculture. This is the case of John Milton, who after living in the city, fell in love and married a Wampis woman and decided to stay. He is still trying to find his space and switches his activities between farming and hunting, but confesses to missing his former urban life. Different is the case of Henery Cuja, who also decided to return after completing a nursing technician course and now provides healthcare in the Ayambis community. He is worried as the heat increases every year and with it the proliferation of mosquitoes that transmit dangerous diseases like malaria, dengue, yellow fever, zika and chikungunya.This billboard is part of a government campaign to raise the awareness of the risks of mosquito-borne illnesses in the department of Amazonas. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Wampis children play. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Those working on the ground in the Peruvian Amazon say deforestation is only making things worse when it comes to threats like malaria, with research indicating logging can increase rates of malaria infection since it creates optimal mosquito breeding habitats: ponds at the edges of forests. According to Cuja, 76 of the 250 residents of the Ayambis community have been infected with malaria, several contracting Plasmodium falciparum – the deadliest malaria species.The Wampis Nation is working to reduce illegal deforestation in their territory. According to Noningo, they have directly expelled illegal miners from their territory. On other occasions, they notified national authorities, who ousted the invaders.An illegally operating gold mine stopped by Wampis intervention. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Addressing logging has been a little more difficult. Unlike other parts of the Amazon rainforest (notably in Brazil), there are no roads in the Wampis region. This makes it more difficult for loggers to clear large areas, but also for authorities to detect illegal deforestation. But Wampis Nation president Wrays Perez says that selective illegal logging is ongoing in the region, with timber smugglers targeting capirona trees (Calycophyllum spruceanum). Also known as bayabochi or mulateiro, the wood from these trees is valuable for use in construction.According to Perez, loggers access these trees from the river at night, with one person acting as a sentry. Once the tree is felled and trimmed, the loggers load it up on their boat in the morning and carry it down the river to sell it.An illegally felled capirona tree. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Illegally harvested timber awaiting pick-up by a boat that will transport it to market. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Since the founding of the Wampis Nation, the relationship between the Wampis and the Peruvian government has been relatively quiet. Lieutenant Colonel Herberts Cavero Medina, head of the Information Section of the 6th Jungle Brigade, attributes this tranquility to the excellent relationship between the Wampis Nation and the Armed Forces of Peru, which has a strong presence in the territory due its location along the border with Ecuador. After a 1995 conflict between Peru and Ecuador known as Cenepa’s War, the army has worked to locate and remove active landmines from many areas in indigenous territory.Medina says that young Wampis serve in several battalions in the region and indirectly receive information on illegal logging and mining operations. The army then informs the country’s authorities to remove the invaders – if the Wampis have not already done so.A soldier in the Peruvian army in camouflage and prepared to watch over the country’s borders. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.The colors of the flag of Peru painted on the face of a Peruvian army soldier. Some soldiers are Wampis members. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Wampis members are allowed to hunt and cultivate up to 5 hectares anywhere they’d like in the territory. And agriculture is profitable. For example, merchants say cocoa can be sold to outside buyers for 3.2 soles per kilo, with a hectare producing on average 1.5 tons per month. Noningo said they’re also considering ways to mine gold “manually, without machines, which is not to attack the forest and to value gold.”The Wampis’ biggest concern is the oil industry, according to Perez. He specifically calls out the Oleoducto Norperuano oil pipeline, part of which runs through Wampis territory. In total pipeline extends 1,106 kilometers from the Amazon rainforest to the Pacific Ocean to supply the Peru’s refineries. The pipeline has a long history of spills and leaks, with at least 23 occurring between 2001 and 2016. In 2016, the pipeline was shut down temporarily after it experienced three spills in five months.A section of the Oleoducto Norperuano pipeline, which runs 1,106 kilometers from the rainforest to the Pacific Ocean. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.Perez is also attentive to the outside world, especially to Brazil, the largest economy in South America. The recent election of far-right Jair Bolsonaro as Brazil’s new president is particularly worrisome to him, and he laments the new government’s move to lump the Ministry of Environment under the Ministry of Agriculture and open up indigenous territories to resource exploitation.“This will greatly affect the Amazon rainforest of Brazil and the rights of the people who live there for thousands of years and have always preserved the forest,” Perez said.Wray Perez, president of the Wampís indigenous community. Photo by Marcio Pimenta.In a world where actions to preserve forests and fight climate change find resistance in the old ideas of new governments, the Wampis are hoping their new identity as a free territory will help change the conversation. For now, though, their focus is on building their capacity and protecting their home.“The Spaniards did not conquer us directly, we were not slaves, we were absorbed when the states were formed, so we need a lot of time to finally organize ourselves with one voice,” Noningo said. Climate Change, Community-based Conservation, Diseases, Environment, Forests, Fossil Fuels, Governance, Government, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Logging, Malaria, Mining, Oil Drilling, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more