Most people with depression receive inadequate treatment or no care at all

first_imgShare on Twitter The vast majority of people with depression across the world are not receiving even minimally adequate treatment for their condition, according to a new study of more than 50,000 people in 21 countries by King’s College London, Harvard Medical School and the World Health Organization (WHO).The research, published today in the British Journal of Psychiatry, reports that of 4,331 people with depression across all 21 countries, treatment rates vary widely. In high income countries only one in five people with depression receive adequate treatment. The situation in the poorest countries of the world is far worse, where one in 27 people with depression receive adequate treatment.Globally, an estimated 350 million people of all ages suffer from depression, and the condition is the leading cause of disability worldwide. There is an increasing awareness that depression can be reliably diagnosed and treated in primary care settings using psychological therapy or medication, yet these scientifically proven and effective treatments are not being delivered on a wide scale. LinkedIn Email The researchers analysed data from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys, a series of 23 community surveys in 21 countries. These included 10 low or middle income countries (Brazil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Iraq, Lebanon, Mexico, Nigeria, People’s Republic of China (PRC), Peru and Romania) and 11 high income countries (Argentina, Belgium, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the USA).The researchers defined minimally adequate treatment as receiving either pharmacotherapy (at least one month of medication plus four or more visits to a doctor) or psychotherapy (at least eight visits with any professional including religious or spiritual advisor, social worker or counsellor).Professor Graham Thornicroft from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London, who led the study, said: ‘We call on national and international organisations to make adequate resources available for scaling up the provision of mental health services so that no one with depression is left behind. Our results indicate that much treatment currently offered to people with depression falls far short of the criteria for evidence-based and effective treatment.‘Intriguingly, about half of all people with depression did not think they had a problem that needed treatment and this proportion fell to only a third in the poorest countries. This strongly suggests that we also need to support people with depression and their family members to recognise that they have a treatable condition and should seek treatment and care.’Professor Thornicroft added: ‘Providing treatment at the scale required to treat all people with depression is crucial, not only for decreasing disability and death by suicide, but also from a moral and human rights perspective, and to help people to be fully productive members of society.’This study was carried out in conjunction with the World Health Organization World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative.center_img Pinterest Share on Facebook Sharelast_img read more

Scenes From 2019 Pet Palooza At Christian Church

first_imgScenes from the 2019 Pet Palooza held June 11-13 at the Christian Church of Los Alamos at 92 East Road. The event featured farm animals, wild animals and pets. Some of the activities for the children included animal education, games, roping practice, horse rides, face painting, Bible stories, pinewood derby animal races and a green screen photo booth. Animal guests included horses, chickens, honey bees, an owl, kestrel, hawk, rabbit, geese, snakes and a pony. Photo by Daren SavageScene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage  Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savage Scene from Pet Palooza at the Christian Church. Photo by Daren Savagelast_img read more

Los Alamos County Prepares For COVID-19

first_imgIn response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Los Alamos County Emergency Operations Center is set up at the Los Alamos Police Department and currently operating virtually. Courtesy/LACBy KIRSTEN LASKEYLos Alamos Daily Postkirsten@ladailypost.comLos Alamos County and Los Alamos Medical Center (LAMC) have prepared for when the COVID-19 coronavirus makes its way into the community.One case has been announced. N3B, a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contractor that handles legacy waste cleanup, informed employees late Monday that one of its workers tested positive for COVID-19.In the announcement published Tuesday in the Los Alamos Daily Post, N3B management said, “We are working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the New Mexico Department of Health (NM DOH) to ensure coworkers who had contact with the individual take appropriate action and seek medical attention if symptoms arise.”N3B administrative workforce has worked remotely for more than two weeks and reduced its field work last Friday to essential mission critical activities, according to the announcement.The Post received information that the individual testing positive for the coronavirus lives in Sandoval County, however, N3B has not confirmed that information.Although Los Alamos has been relatively fortunate so far, County and hospital officials are being proactive in responding to this pandemic.Los Alamos County Emergency Manager Beverley Simpson said during an interview Monday with the Post that the New Mexico Department of Health is providing testing for the COVID-19 virus, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at Overlook Park in White Rock.“We are hoping to provide more testing to those who are unable to get out of town or haven’t met the criteria for getting tested,” Simpson said.To further educate the public on how to take precautions against the virus, Simpson said the County plans to distribute flyers to residents about the importance of social distancing and numbers to call for more information “so individuals can get the assistance if they require it.”Regarding the largest employer in town, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Simpson said she is in contact with LANL officials daily to discuss what is occurring at different locations. She added that most LANL employees are working remotely (approximately 5,000 LANL employees who are Los Alamos County residents).Other County departments have taken measures to address COVID-19.“I encourage folks to continue social distancing and avoid large crowds,” Police Chief Dino Sgambellone said. “Together, as a community, we will get through this. Following the CDC’s guidelines on social distancing and hygiene will get us through that much sooner.”Police are continuing to respond to emergencies and calls for service throughout the community. However, for the duration of the COVID-19 public health emergency, officers may elect to handle certain non-emergency calls via telephone. Learn more at https://www.losalamosnm.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=6435810&pageId=6504167Regarding the fire department, “I think the main thing we would ask is if you call 911, please let the dispatcher know if you or anyone in your home has symptoms consistent with COVID-19,” Fire Chief Troy Hughes said. “This could be for a medical call or unrelated fire-based call. Our responders will be following protocols designed to stop the spread if given this information.”LAMC CEO John Whiteside said the hospital is prepared to treat anyone who has contracted the virus.“We’ve been prepared since the virus came out,” Whiteside said. “We have extensive policies and procedures that we worked with the CDC and state Department of Health to develop.”Simpson commends the community for how proactive and responsive it has been.“This is a very well read and intelligent community,” she said. “Most people here follow the rules, we have not seen issues at all with people congregating or large groups going out. We still encourage people to get out … running, exercising, hiking on trials – there are lots of opportunities to do things. We are lucky to still have those outdoor activities available to us.”Chief Sgambellone agreed.“I think most citizens have been doing their part with respect to compliance with the Governor’s order,” he said. “I see a number of people exercising and walking their dogs and I encourage that. It is challenging for people to remain confined to their residence and the ability to get some fresh air is not only healthy but will likely limit tensions within the home that could lead to regrettable domestic violence situations.“Unfortunately, we had some criminals decide to take advantage of the current situation and break in to several Los Alamos businesses. I want to assure the public we are aggressively investigating these crimes and continue to employ various security strategies to safeguard our citizens, their businesses and homes.”Simpson said citizen-created Facebook pages such as Los Alamos Helping Each Other During COVID-19 are excellent.“They are doing a fantastic job,” she said.Federal response can take weeks, so it is really inspiring to see neighbors helping one another, Simpson said.“I appreciate everyone,” she said. “Our community’s willingness and ability to help others … it is inspirational to see what this community can come together and do for each other.”Simpson said she has put in requests to the Department of Homeland Security’s emergency management and the Department of Health for medical Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and cleaning supplies. Simpson said she expects to receive a response this week to her requests.“I’m (also) actively working on sheltering capacity in the event we have a surge at the hospital,” Simpson said.During the Los Alamos County Council meeting Tuesday, County Manager Harry Burgess reported more details about the County’s options for additional shelters in the event the hospital fills to capacity.Burgess said the County has six identified locations shelters, which include four churches and two schools including Los Alamos Middle School and Los Alamos High School. He said the American Red Cross has reviewed these shelters for infrastructure, mechanical equipment and ADA access.Burgess said that people are sheltering in their homes and that the medical community recommends people stay in their homes for isolation purposes as well as to keep space open at the hospital for those with critical needs.Burgess also touched on the issue of masks during his briefing to Council. He said that the CDC is altering its recommendations on masks but nothing definite has yet been issued. He added that the County does not have the authority to order everyone to wear a mask.On the state level, Burgess said President Trump has approved the New Mexico state’s request for a U.S. Army field hospital, which will provide more than 250 beds. He added that during the Governor’s most recent press conference, it was announced that access to a former Lovelace Hospital in Albuquerque has been acquired to help accommodate needs across New Mexico.Los Alamos County has a page dedicated on it website to the corona virus; it can be viewed at https://www.losalamosnm.us/government/departments/emergency_management___e_m_/pandemic_and_coronaviruslast_img read more

On The Job In Los Alamos: County Zero Waste Team

first_imgOn the Job in Los Alamos is Los Alamos County Zero Waste Team member Katie Myers checking people into the drive-in movie, ‘Just Eat It’ Friday night at Central Park Square. The event was organized by the Zero Waste team as well as Central Park Square Owner Philip Kunsberg in an effort to educate the public about food waste. Unfortunately, the rain storm forced the event to be canceled but the Zero Waste Team hopes to show the film to the community in the future. Click here or more information about the County’s Zero Waste Program. #worklosalamos #wherediscoveriesaremade. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com Los Alamos County Environmental Services Office Specialist Sara Martinez sets up Friday for the drive-in movie. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com Zero Waste Team member Sue Barnes marks off spaces in the parking lot Friday for film goers to park their vehicles. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

Business group seeks Manchester road charge vote

first_imgThe transport secretary announced £1.5bn of government grants for 23 improvement schemes to Greater Manchester’s public transport system, including extensions to the Metrolink tram network and new transport interchanges in the outlying boroughs.Another £1.2bn will be borrowed by the local authorities, with repayments financed by a peak-time congestion charge introduced in 2013 that will charge up to £5 a day for commuters coming from outside the M60 motorway to the city centre.The proposals will now be subject to public consultation for three months, sparking a fierce battle over the controversial congestion charging plan. It will not go ahead if more than three of Greater Manchester’s 10 local authorities oppose it.The Greater Manchester Momentum Group, whose 120 members include large employers such as Kellogg’s, Unilever and Peel Holdings, said a congestion charge would hold back the local economy and hit employees already facing higher food and fuel prices. Financial Timeslast_img read more

Stamp duty changes in Wales will see average home exempt from tax

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Researchers develop new low cost, high efficiency solar technology

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Uncool customer

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

UK shares Europe’s guilt

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

The revenge of Judy Veakins

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more